• This site requires you to update your browser. Your browsing experience may be affected by not having the most up to date version.
    Please visit http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/ to upgrade.

  • JavaScript has been disabled in your browser. Please enable JavaScript to experience the full functionality of our website.

Eggs & Omega 3

shutterstock 1551347897 v2

Eggs & Omega 3

Do Eggs Have Omega-3?

You bet they do. Eggs are mother nature’s incredible and edible source of Omega-3 fatty acids, providing on average, 180mg per serve (2 eggs).

Of this amount, 114mg is the long-chain type of omega-3 fatty acid – which represents between 71-127% of the desired intake for adults.

Yet before we go on to discuss the benefits of why you need Omega-3s, let’s ensure you’ve got the full rundown on just what they are.

2 eggs side by side

So, What are Omega-3s?

Omega-3s are a group of essential fatty acids that play vital roles within your body, providing several key health benefits.

And as your body can't produce Omega-3s on its own, it has to be absorbed through various diet sources.

There are three main types of omega-3 fatty acids — ALA (short-chain), DHA and EPA (long-chains).

  1. ALA
    Alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA) is the most common omega-3 fatty acid in your diet.

    ALA can be found in foods such as flaxseeds, chia seeds, hemp seeds, walnuts and soybeans.
  2. EPA
    Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) is principally found in animal products, such as fatty fish and fish oil. However, some algae also contain EPA.

    It has several functions in your body including having anti-inflammatory effects and forming part of cell membranes. Some EPA can also be converted into DHA.
  3. DHA
    Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) is a vital omega-3 fatty acid in your body.

    It’s a key fundamental element of your brain, the retina of your eyes, and numerous other body parts.

    Like EPA, it occurs mainly in animal products such as fatty fish, fish oil, grass-fed meat and dairy, and of course, our favourite – eggs.

What Are Omega-3s Good For?

In addition to being essential for general health and wellbeing, meeting daily requirements for omega-3's is one of the ways to help reduce the risk of a number of health conditions including:

  • Heart disease, inflammatory and auto-immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • Cognitive decline and dementia

Omega-3s are also important for:

  • Promoting good eye health
  • Assisting with brain and nervous system development in infants
  • Maintaining good mental health and wellbeing

Do Eggs Contain DHA?

We all know fish are amongst the highest in DHA Omega-3's fatty acids. But what if you can't eat seafood – or don't like it? Hello eggs!

And yes, whilst eggs contain lower amounts of naturally occurring DHA, they are a simple and easily accessible Omega-3 boost.

Of course, if you're concerned around your optimal Omega-3 intake, contact your doctor for information about how to best support your health and lifestyle needs.

What Are Some Other High Omega-3 Foods?

We know eggs are a fantastic source of Omega-3s - but Omega-3 is also found naturally amongst various food groups, including:

  • Fish and other seafood – particularly cold-water oily fish, such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, herring, and sardines
  • Seeds and nuts – flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts
  • Plant oils – flaxseed oil, soybean oil, canola oil

Good sources of fat in foods

How Much Omega-3 Do I Need Each Day?

The Heart Foundation’s most recent recommendations for best prevention of heart disease, including those living with existing heart disease, is as follows:

  • Aim for 2-3 serves of fish (150-200g) per week, to achieve approximately 250-500mg per day of combined EPA and DHA.
  • Aim for 1g of short-chain omega-3 (ALA) per day.

What Are Omega-3 Enriched Eggs?

You might have seen omega-3 enriched eggs in your local supermarket and wondered how they pack more fatty-acids into the eggs. Well, there's no genetic modification at play.

The chickens are simply fed a diet containing flaxseed, which is known to contain large amounts of ALA, to then produce omega-3 enriched eggs. Also, when the chickens digest the flaxseed, some of the ALA is broken down into DHA so both fatty acids are then transferred to the yolk. Win-win.

Looking for some easy ways to ensure you’re hitting your required dose of Omega-3s? Get inspired with some delicious and nutritious egg recipes here.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do Eggs Have Omega-3?

Eggs are mother nature’s incredible and edible source of Omega-3 fatty acids, providing on average, 180mg per serve (2 eggs).

What Are the Three Main Types of Omega-3 Fatty Acids?

 ALA (short-chain), DHA and EPA  (long-chains).

What Are Omega-3s Good For?

In addition to being essential for general health and wellbeing, meeting daily requirements for omega-3's is one of the ways to help reduce the risk of a number of health conditions including: heart disease, cognitive decline and dementia.

Do Eggs Contain DHA?

Yes, whilst eggs contain lower amounts of naturally occurring DHA, they are a simple and easily accessible Omega-3 boost.

How Much Omega-3 Do I Need Each Day?

Aim for 2-3 serves of fish (150-200g) per week, to achieve approximately 250-500mg per day of combined EPA and DHA. Aim for 1g of short-chain omega-3 (ALA) per day.

What Are Omega-3 Enriched Eggs?

The chickens are simply fed a diet containing flaxseed, which is known to contain large amounts of ALA, to then produce omega-3 enriched eggs.

Want to see what an egg farm looks like? Take this interactive 360 degree tour to see how eggs are produced in Australia.

Free range farm with two people