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Eggs & Diabetes

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Eggs & Diabetes

Diabetes is one of a handful of health concerns that comes under constant media and medical attention. And for good reason – it's a condition that affects a great number of Australians.

And while recent studies have alerted some concern around the role eggs play in the diet of diabetics, it’s safe to say we’re across the current research and looking to put your minds at ease.

eggs under the microscope for diabetes

Are Eggs Good For People With Diabetes?

The short answer is yes. Because knowing what we know about mitigating the risks of developing type 2 diabetes, a healthier diet is one of the simplest means of reducing the risk.

Eggs are an exceptionally nutritious food, providing a great source of high-quality protein, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants – not to mention quick to serve up and delicious to eat.

And when managing weight – one of the risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes – including eggs in your diet regularly makes for better appetite control, and provides a greater sense of feeling full.

Will I Get Diabetes From Eating Eggs?

No. No single food is the cause of diabetes.  What is most important is to include eggs as part of an eating pattern that is healthy, varied and balanced.

Diabetes is a condition characterised by high levels of glucose in the blood. It's namely caused either by the inability of a person to produce insulin (a hormone made by the pancreas to regulate blood glucose levels) or by the body not being able to use insulin effectively – and sometimes both. 

Based on self-reported data,  'An estimated 1.2 million Australians (4.9%) of the population) have diabetes. (Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2017–18 National Health Survey)

The most common types of diabetes are;

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong autoimmune disease that usually has an onset during childhood or early adolescence. Though the exact cause is chiefly unknown, it's believed to be the result of an intersect of environmental and genetic factors. It is an irreversible condition, and while being a serious health concern, is highly treatable by modern standards. Typically any person living with type 1 diabetes requires a daily insulin injection to maintain sufficient health and survival. 

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the more common form of diabetes and the type that is more closely linked to lifestyle.

Type 2 diabetes generally occurs at a later stage than type 1 diabetes. People who develop type 2 diabetes generally produce insulin, yet do not produce enough or cannot use it effectively. And though it involves some genetic component or predisposition,  type 2 diabetes is largely linked to lifestyle.

The risk of type 2 diabetes increases with negative lifestyle factors including; physical inactivity, poor diet, high alcohol consumption, being overweight or obese, and smoking. 

The good news is it can often be sufficiently managed with adjustments to nutrition and exercise, alongside a wide-range of clinically-prescribed medications if needed.

How Many Eggs Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat?


Both research and health experts indicate that individuals living with type 2 diabetes, or at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, can include between 6 - 12 eggs per week as part of an overall healthy diet. 

So you can enjoy up to 2 eggs, 6 times a week.

Do Eggs Lower Blood Sugar?

Some research has connected egg consumption to curbing and controlling blood sugar.

A recent international study across 42 adults (overweight with either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes) showed that eating one large egg per day led to a significant 4.4% reduction in fasting blood sugar, in addition to an overall improvement in insulin sensitivity, compared with that of an egg substitute. 

As well as a quality protein source, eggs contain at a minimum; 13 vitamins and minerals, omega-3 fatty acids and active antioxidants – making them an ideal contribution to your daily protein and nutritional requirements.

At Australian Eggs, we remain up to date with all latest research, however for any specific guidance, please seek the advice of your healthcare professional.

What Are Some Healthy Ways For People With Diabetes To Eat Eggs?

The most nutritious way to cook eggs is to simply boil, poach, or scramble them. 

We also recommend pairing eggs with chopped vegetables, greens and salads – instead of eating them alongside high saturated-fat foods, like bacon, sausages or served with pastry. 

And if you're planning to fry your eggs, consider switching your oil to one that is more heart-smart; like corn, canola, or olive oil.

P.S. If you’re looking for some delicious and nutritious new ways to enjoy eggs – be sure to try some of our heart-healthy recipes.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can Eggs Cause Diabetes?

No. No single food is the cause of diabetes.  What is most important is to include eggs as part of your healthy eating pattern that is varied and balanced.

Can People With Diabetes Eat Eggs?

Those living with type 2 diabetes, or at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, can include between 6 - 12 eggs per week as part of their overall healthy diet. 

Are Eggs Good For Reducing Risk Of Diabetes?

A healthier diet is one of the simplest means of reducing the risk of Type 2 Diabetes. In addition to their incredible array of health benefits – including eggs in your diet regularly makes for better appetite control (for weight management), and provides a greater sense of feeling full.

Want to see what an egg farm looks like? Take this interactive 360 degree tour to see how eggs are produced in Australia.

Free range farm with two people