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Eggs & Fat

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Eggs & Fat

 

Over the years, fat has copped its fair share of bad billing, yet fat actually plays an important role in helping you meet your daily nutritional needs. Your body requires a healthy intake of dietary fat for energy and several critical processes – such as the absorption of certain key vitamins, minerals and enzymes.


When it comes to dietary fat and health, there are different types of fat and the relative proportion of each that you eat is what matters most.

How Much Fat Is In Eggs?

Eggs contain on average 10.3 grams of total fat per serve (2 eggs) – the majority - 6.9 grams - of that fat is also classified as unsaturated, with only 3.4 grams being saturated fat.

Egg with measure tape

What Are Dietary Fats?

Fat is classified into two main types – saturated and unsaturated fat.

Why Do We Need Fat?

Fat provides essential fatty acids which your body cannot produce for itself. Therefore a certain amount of fat is important as part of a healthy and balanced diet.

In addition to being a primal energy source, fat helps your body absorb Vitamins A, D and E. These vitamins are fat-soluble, which means they can only be absorbed with the assistance of fats present.

Any fat that's not used by your body's cells or used for energy is then converted into body fat – much the same as any excessive intake of carbohydrates or proteins.

What Are The Good Fats?

The term “good” fat you've no doubt heard is referring to unsaturated fats. These are divided into two types – monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Consumption of these fats is widely encouraged as the preferred types of fats in the diet as they are linked to lowering the risk of many diseases. Foods high in these good fats include vegetable oils (like olive, sunflower, canola, soy), nuts, seeds, and fish.

Saturated fats by comparison are best consumed in moderation. Foods carrying large amounts of saturated fat include fatty red meat, commercial pastries , and butter. Also, plant-based fats like coconut oil and palm oil contain high amounts of saturated fat.

Rather than trying to cut out fat altogether, it's beneficial to learn a little more about why these two types of fat are essential, and how they affect your healthy bodily functions.

Good sources of fat in foods

Why Do They Say Fat Is Bad?

While we used to think that a low-fat diet was the way toward better health, this is no longer the case. Research today shows that the types of fat matter more than the amount.

What Are The Bad Fats?

This is the kind that gives all fat a bad rap. And for good reason. These "bad" fats are known as trans fats.

They contain close to no nutritional value and are damaging to your health, even when eaten in small quantities.

Trans fats are often found in:

  • Fried foods – fries, fried chicken, donuts
  • Processed foods – toppings, candy, margarines in which the first ingredient is not a liquid oil
  • Baked goods – cookies, cakes, pies

While some meat and dairy products contain small-trace amounts of naturally occurring trans fats, it’s not clear as to whether this naturally occurring trans fat holds any benefit or harm.

Do Eggs Contain Good Fat Or Bad Fat?

Eggs contain an average of 10.3 grams of total fat per serve of eggs* making them a moderate source of dietary fat. The majority of the fat in eggs is unsaturated with 3.4 grams being saturated fat.

And being incredibly filling and high in protein, research shows people who replace a grain-based breakfast with eggs often end up consuming fewer calories and losing weight.

Rather than simply adopting a low-fat diet, focus on eating beneficial “good” fats – and reducing your intake of “bad” fats. Also, research suggests that certain higher-fat diets, such as the Mediterranean diet and lower-carbohydrate diets, can in fact be more beneficial to your overall health.

Ultimately, your habits, genetics, and lifestyle are the best indicators of your nutritional needs – and if in doubt, always contact your doctor or nutritionist for detailed advice.

And if you’re looking for fresh healthsmart ways to enjoy eggs, here are some great low-fat recipes to point you in the right direction.

Frequently Asked Questions

How Much Fat Is In Eggs?

Eggs contain on average 10.3 grams of total fat per serve (2 eggs).

What Are Dietary Fats?

Fat is classified into two main types – saturated and unsaturated fat.

What Are The Good Fats?

The term “good” fat you've no doubt heard is referring to unsaturated fats. Consumption of these fats is widely encouraged as the preferred types of fats in the diet as they are linked to lowering the risk of many diseases.

What Are The Bad Fats?

"Bad" fats are known as trans fats. They contain close to no nutritional value and are damaging to your health, even when eaten in small quantities.

Do Eggs Contain Good Fat Or Bad Fat?

Eggs contain an average of 10.3 grams of total fat per serve of eggs* making them a moderate source of dietary fat. The majority of the fat in eggs is unsaturated with 3.4 grams being saturated fat.

Want to see what an egg farm looks like? Take this interactive 360 degree tour to see how eggs are produced in Australia.

Free range farm with two people