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Your Questions

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Are eggs bad for you?

Are eggs bad for you?

No. If you're fit and healthy, there is little cause for concern. The vast majority of modern research suggests eggs pose no major risk to our health – and are significantly more likely to provide key and lasting health benefits.

The National Heart Foundation also places no limit on how many eggs regular, healthy people can eat.

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Can Eggs Be Bad For You?

It’s time for the hard-boiled truths.

Since the dawning of time, humans have enjoyed the ritual of their daily eggs. Always delicious and nutritious as a classic on toast, or a morning omelette, and in some cultures, even laid over a bed of rice. 

However, eggs have come under the microscope for being linked with various health concerns, most notably heart health and cholesterol levels, leading some people to question; are we eating too much of a good thing?

Let’s shed light on some of the facts, to put your mind at ease and ensure you're making a trusted and informed choice each time you crack that yolk.  

Are Eggs Bad for Cholesterol?

After years and years of research into this topic, the short answer is no. Eggs have little to no impact on blood cholesterol levels, particularly when eaten as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

Obviously, one of the main concerns around eggs has always been the level of cholesterol contained in that little yellow yolk. 

While we know that eggs are naturally rich in dietary cholesterol, containing 398mg of cholesterol per serve, we're also aware that cholesterol consumption isn’t quite that simple – because the more cholesterol you eat, the less your body produces. This natural feedback system helps you maintain the right balance of cholesterol in the blood. It’s when this feedback loop is out of sync that blood cholesterol levels can rise. One of the key culprits is saturated fat, more so than dietary cholesterol.

This is why our National Heart Foundation guidelines place no limit on how many eggs regular, healthy people can eat, while suggesting that people reduce their intake of saturated fat (foods like biscuits, cakes, pastries and meat fat). The guidelines say that eggs have close to no effect on blood cholesterol levels and recommend regular egg consumption as part of a varied diet that is rich in whole foods and low in saturated fats.

Are Eggs Bad for Heart Disease?

Again if you're fit and healthy, there is little cause for concern. 

The neutral relationship between eggs and heart health means eggs neither increase nor decrease the risk of heart disease in most people. 

See, when it comes to maintaining excellent heart health, it matters more as to what you're eating with your eggs, than the eggs themselves. 

For instance, the foods that are high in saturated fats like pastries or bacon on your plate, are of greater risk to your rising cholesterol than the poached egg on the side.  

How Many Eggs are Too Many?

The National Heart Foundation has lifted any restriction on egg consumption for average, healthy people. 

You’re free to eat eggs without limitation - as part of any wholesome and balanced diet. We recommend you follow the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating to ensure you eat a good variety of foods across the week that will help you meet your nutrient targets.

It’s worth noting that some people are more sensitive to consuming dietary cholesterol than others. For these people, a maximum of seven eggs a week is recommended. This includes those living with: 

- High LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) 
- Type 2 Diabetes
- Any Existing Heart Disease 

Lastly, When Are Eggs Bad?

It's certainly a complex issue, as science can't be definitive for each individual case. While researchers are a long way from understanding why eggs affect individuals differently, the vast majority of modern research suggests eggs pose no major risk to our health – and are significantly more likely to provide key and lasting health benefits.

Of course, if you do have pressing concerns as per your individual situation, we suggest consulting your local health professional or GP.